Politics

  • Is Finland's basic income a good idea?

    By on Jan. 6, 2017

    On New Year's Day, Finland implemented a trial run of an unconditonal basic income - selecting 2,000 citizens at random and paying them 560 euros per month. It's a scheme that's been discussed in many countries across Europe in the past, but can it actually work? 

  • Why is the whole of the EU talking about CETA? 

    The EU-Canada Trade Agreement (CETA) has been a concern in many member states recently. The European Council attempted to overcome the deadlock caused by Wallonia’s refusal to back Belgium in signing on the agreement, but to no avail. Cafébabel asks what CETA means and why it’s important for the EU’s trade policy in the future...

  • Belgian resistance scuppers the EU's CETA agreement

    By on Oct. 19, 2016

    The EU's trade ministers postponed signing the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) on Tuesday after failing to reach an agreement. The strongest opposition comes from the French-speaking part of Belgium, whose consent the federal government needs to approve the agreement. Are the Walloons spoiling a major opportunity for Europe or are they the voice of the people?

  • Germany is in revolt over TTIP and CETA

    By on Sept. 27, 2016

    While the EU negotiates the free trade agreements Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the USA, more dissent is stirring in Germany than in any other country - even though Germany is one of the countries that will profit the most from these agreements. We asked why the Germans protest so actively.

  • Map of the Week: University fees in Europe

    By on Aug. 2, 2016

    Application season is long over; now students are desperately waiting to see whether they'll be offered a place at university. If Mum and Dad don't have the funds to help you, you should avoid going to England to study: that's where the tuiton fees are highest.

  • Behind the numbers: Basic income, who'd have it best?

    By on June 17, 2016

    On Sunday the 5th of June, the Swiss rejected the idea of an unconditional basic income, a concept is mired in controversy. While some see it as the first step on the way to a socialist utopia, others are sounding warning alarms. Meanwhile, The Economist has calculated how much citizens would get if a basic income was introduced in other countries.

  • Behind the numbers: 5% of Greek bailout went to citizens

    By on May 9, 2016

    Cutbacks in public spending, increased taxes, reforms to pension and unemployment policies – these are just some of the effects that austerity measures have had on the Greek people. Since 2010, the country has received 215.9 billion euros in bailouts. Where did all that money go?

  • TTIP: Long live the leaks!

    By on May 3, 2016

    Greenpeace published confidential documents on Sunday that reveal the current state of the negotiations on the TTIP free trade pact. Commentators take different views of the coup, with some saying that the politicians must not act without consulting the people and others arguing that such transparency hurts Europe's bargaining position.

  • Steel Crisis: Solid interview with Édouard Martin

    By on May 2, 2016

    On the 11th of April, the Indian conglomerate Tata Steel announced its withdrawal from the United Kingdom, the consequences of which could be felt all over Europe. To understand this latest steel crisis, we spoke to French MEP Édouard Martin of the Socialists & Democrats – a former steelworker and big defender of the industry – to shed some light on the situation.

  • #VentyourRent: London renters' horror stories go viral

    By on May 2, 2016

    In the run-up to the London Mayoral elections on the 5th of May, London renters have been sharing their horror stories of overpriced and unacceptable properties in the capital. Organised by the Generation Rent association, the campaign hopes to keep the housing crisis as a top priority for whoever emerges victorious on Thursday.