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The curse of the golden goal

Article published on June 29, 2012
Article published on June 29, 2012
By Aris KokkinosThe Euro (football tournament) is for a while replacing the euro (single currency). People at the Council’s cafeteria followed passionately the semifinal between Italy and Germany, and now fans expect to see who will win the cup, Balotelli or Torres. But is it a blessing to win the Euro? What is the relationship between football and the sovereign debt crisis?
It’s not so obvious at first glance. Although, if you look closer...Remembe: in 2004, Greece wins the Euro. Four years later, Greece is plunged into a dramatic sovereign debt crisis: an unprecedented economic decline, the banks at bay, unemployment rising up. In 2008, Spain is victorious. Four years later, Spain in turn is suffering the same torments as Greece. In 2012, who’s next? Will Spain reiterate its success, and then maybe double its deficit, or will Italy follow the economic curse of Paul the octopus? Of course football is not an absolute paradigm. On the contrary, it boosts consumption, at least momentarily, and it distracts people, which is always a good thing. Nevertheless it is a good indicator of the general situation of a society. The fact that Mediterranean countries are at their best reminds that football, although it isn’t enough to heal economy, consoles a population in times of trouble. Therefore it may be a good thing for Germany that she won’t win the Euro. Nowadays, to win at football could be a bad sign for the future...Let's debate on it!