Luca Romagnoli: 'The EU always follows American interests'

Article published on June 2, 2009
Article published on June 2, 2009

This article has not been vetted by an editor at Paris HQ

Since 2004, the national secretary of the Italian right-wing party 'Fiamma Tricolore', 48, has been an MEP - despite not supporting any particular party

Lets go over the legislation, highlighting the good and the bad points

Aamong the positive points - the new powers which the European parliament will have, the transparency rules (initiated by lobbyists - ed), the environmental measures, the REACH regulations and the support to the transport network. I do not approve of the Lisbon treaty because it limits national identity and imposes a decision-making system on the state where outside of the apparent 'majority rules principle', major powers like France and Germany play a more decisive role.

Do you have any regrets?

Foto, Parlamento EuropeoI would have wanted a Europe that wasn't crushed by America and its views and a Europe that was capable of instigating discussions with Russia. Then, I would wish that there were fewer major declarations towards China on the topic of human rights and more concrete actions, for example taxes on their products that are connected with the exploitation of manpower and environment.

The European elections are upon us but according to the Eurobarometer are filled with many unknown faces...

A huge ignorance surrounds the EU. I was a victim of it before I was elected. There are two ways of knowing something - to be a part of it or to learn about it at school. The EU doesn't examine itself enough. In order to fill this knowledge gap, the European commission seeks to take advantage of the internet, TV adverts - now what do you think of that?

'The European commission must press governments because at least on TV audiences can receive dozens of hours worth of programmes on the subject' 

Are the economy, inflation and unemployment really the biggest worries for the Europeans?

Those who are optimistic to begin with remain motivated. There is a certain national autonomy in economic fields.I don't want to be misunderstood, I only confirm that today national interest doesn't make sense and you can not delegate something to all Europe.

Are eurobonds (an international bond that is denominated in a currency not native to the country where it is issued) a solution to relaunch the economy?

It is a proposal which presupposes full confidence in the ECB (European central bank) and in a europeanised banking system that I don't yet feel we have. Does the ECB offer sufficient guarantees of reimbursement? Or will it simply perplex or trouble investors?

Will the gas crisis between Russia and the Ukraine threaten the rise? How will independent energy add to this?

Nuclear power will resolve the problem for the next thirty years but it's not true that it will make us independent. It reinforces relations with Russia who is our principle partner and revises our relationship with Iran (according to the worlds gas producers). It seems to me that we always follow the interests of America and this isn't useful.' Israeli bombs, Hamas's racism and then reconstruction of cities paid for with European money.

I do not understand why Europe has not succeeded in mediating Israel-Palestine

The problem is simple appearances - Israel wants the security of the state and the Palestinians want to be self-determined. They are the two adversaries who must find a concrete way to live together and guns will never resolve the problem. Personally, I am always in favour of two states and two peoples and frankly I do not understand why Europe has not succeeded in mediating. The situation is complicated by the disagreements between Hamas and Al-Fatah which do not permit the two territories to have their own administration.

Is Hamas a terrorist organisation?

I am more prudent on this subject. It is a democratically elected organisation which sustains itself with terrorist acts, as if it hasn't considered these acts to be classified as bad behaviour.

Would Israel becoming part of the EU help create a solution?

I haven't any prejudices but the EU is already too far-spread and we still take the problems of the most recent enlargement for granted. First we must ask ourselves what we are. If we are a large market we must establish rules and allow everyone to enter: Israelis, Moroccans, Turks. If we wish to maintain an identity profile we must really think before we enlarge ourselves again.

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