How not to get lost in the Parisian Metro

Article published on Dec. 23, 2009
Article published on Dec. 23, 2009
Author: Lea Linin Riding in the Parisian Metro and probably any other subway in the world is like being in an electronic music video. The context is that of a constant repetitive sound produced by the train gliding along the tracks. Complementing this unchanging and sedative ambiance is the sound of doors opening and closing every two minutes or so.
The flow of people getting on and off and a siren – like sound announcing that the doors will soon be closed brings urgency to the otherwise uninterrupted state of dozing off. The subway changes your perception of reality. It’s like living in another dimension even if it only takes fifteen minutes to reach your desired destination. It might be broad daylight outside, but riding in the subway always leaves you with the impression that it’s pitch-dark. And the sterile quality of the lights on the train. Perception – distorting. Getting the hang of how the Parisian Metro works is probably the easiest compared to other subway systems. Or at least, I’ve been told so. A friend of mine told me that the mere thought of the New York subway makes her burst into a fit of panic. I can understand her concern. New York’s grandeur gives people a sense of awe, leaves them with their mouths gaping. But you are bound to understand it somehow.

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