2012 Summer Business Programme in Shanghai for students and young professionals

Article published on March 21, 2012
Article published on March 21, 2012
Building the Sino-European Future China drives world business. As the world’s fastest-growing major economy, the largest exporter and the second largest importer, all roads lead to the Middle Kingdom. Today’s business leaders understand the global role of China.
The opportunities to grasp the global trends and immerse oneself in the fascinating world of growing Chinese economy seem to be limited for European students. The frequent question,Do you know any summer programmes in China that combine business courses, internship experience, and fun?, can be finally answered. Europe-China Strategic Alliance with partnership of the prestigious Shanghai University of Finance and Economics offers a unique summer business programme in Shanghai from July 12th to August 24th 2012.

Academics, internship, and pleasure

Many European students want to connect pleasure with work experience and not squander a whole summer on frivolous travels. The Business in China Summer Programme will be held in Shanghai and offers a combination of academics, work experience, and pleasure. This intensive six-week programme aims to help European students gain a deep understanding of Chinese culture through courses at the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, a month-long internship, as well as networking and cultural events. The programme is designed for all undergraduates, postgraduates, and MBA students passionate about emerging countries.Transcripts with ECTS credits will be granted by the Shanghai University of Finance and Economics.

Insights about China for European students – Want to Do Business in China?

Lin, a young Chinese girl traveling through Europe confessed that this programme is a great opportunity for European students who want to take advantage of the growing economy in China. Take for example Starbucks, she says, if this Western company did not understand the Chinese culture and the country’s dynamics they would not have been so successful with their aggressive growth in this emerging market. “Now, I am able to sip my Green Tea Latte and enjoy my favorite leaf teas from Starbucks in China,” her eyes spark and she sinks into Starbucks oblivion. She still looks forward to seeing more of European premium products whether food or clothing in the Chinese stores. Might you be their future exporter to the Chinese market?

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